Published in  
Food
 on  
1/18/2023

Is Being A Vegetarian Healthy?

People switch to vegetarianism for a variety of reasons, including their health, their religious beliefs, their worries about the welfare of animals or the use of antibiotics and hormones in cattle, or their desire to eat in a way that minimizes the use of excessive amounts of natural resources. Because they cannot afford to consume meat, some individuals eat mostly vegetarian food. The year-round availability of fresh produce, the increase in vegetarian dining alternatives, and the expanding culinary impact of nations with predominantly plant-based diets have all contributed to the attraction and accessibility of being a vegetarian.

In the past, studies on vegetarianism have mostly examined potential nutritional inadequacies; however, in recent years, the pendulum has swung the other way, and research is now focusing on the health advantages of a meat-free diet.

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Nowadays, eating a plant-based diet is acknowledged as a means to prevent many chronic illnesses in addition to providing adequate nutrients. “Adequately designed vegetarian diets, especially fully vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthy, nutritionally sufficient, and may give health advantages in the prevention and treatment of certain illnesses,” claims the American Dietetic Association.

The operative phrase is “appropriately designed.” Being a vegetarian won’t necessarily be healthy for you unless you adhere to advice on diet, fat consumption, and weight management. After all, a diet consisting of Pepsi, cheese pizza, and sweets is considered to be “vegetarian.”

Make sure you consume a variety of fruits, veggies, and whole grains for optimal health. It’s crucial to substitute healthy fats like those in nuts, olive oil, and canola oil for trans and saturated fats. And always remember that you will gain weight if you consume too many calories, even from nutrient-dense, low-fat, plant-based foods. As a result, it’s crucial to read food labels, use portion control, and exercise frequently.